From the Associate Editor Fast ForWord (FFW) is a controversial and provocative language intervention program that has drawn keen attention from clinicians, researchers, and the general public. This form of computer-assisted instruction is both intensive and adaptive, including daily sound and word exercises that are targeted to an individual child's level of performance. ... Editorial
Editorial  |   August 01, 2001
From the Associate Editor
 
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  • Associate Editor
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Editorial
Editorial   |   August 01, 2001
From the Associate Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2001, Vol. 10, 194. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/ed03)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, August 2001, Vol. 10, 194. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/ed03)
Fast ForWord (FFW) is a controversial and provocative language intervention program that has drawn keen attention from clinicians, researchers, and the general public. This form of computer-assisted instruction is both intensive and adaptive, including daily sound and word exercises that are targeted to an individual child's level of performance. The distinguishing feature of the intervention, and what has attracted most attention, is that the exercises use stimuli in which formant transitions are enhanced by being lengthened and amplified. These acoustic modifications are based on the hypothesis that children with language-learning difficulties have difficulty processing rapidly changing temporal information. Since the first published research directly relevant to FFW (Merzenich et al., 1996; Tallal et al., 1996), there has been a need to explore systematic treatment outcomes associated with FFW, how these treatment outcomes compare with other forms of language intervention, and what particular treatment components cause these outcomes to occur.
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