From the Editor The issue that follows is one filled with a wealth of clinically relevant information. Each of the papers reveals a blend of clinical and basic scholarship that serves to represent our professions well. The unique blending of theory and clinical practice represented in this issue serves as a model ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 2001
From the Editor
 
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Article Information
Editorial
Editorial   |   May 01, 2001
From the Editor
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2001, Vol. 10, 98. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/ed02)
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2001, Vol. 10, 98. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/ed02)
The issue that follows is one filled with a wealth of clinically relevant information. Each of the papers reveals a blend of clinical and basic scholarship that serves to represent our professions well. The unique blending of theory and clinical practice represented in this issue serves as a model for all speech-language pathologists and speech and language scientists. The topics are diverse and relate to many different aspects of professional practice.
Sharynne McLeod provides us with a detailed view of normal acquisition of consonant clusters, but focuses specifically on the relation between theory and clinical practice. Her paper also provides important information driven by crosslinguistic studies. Barbara A. Mathers-Schmidt provides an excellent tutorial on paradoxical vocal fold motion, which clearly delineates the role of the speech-language pathologist in the diagnosis and treatment of this complex disorder. Elizabeth Peña’s paper on reducing test bias is driven by the need for culturally and linguistically appropriate test materials in our profession. The work has a strong theoretical basis that Dr. Peña has carefully used to develop appropriate assessment materials for those we serve. Proctor-Williams and Fey provide us with a superlative example of programmatic research in their exploration of parental recasts and production of copulas and articles. Readers of the Journal will find this paper to be a thoughtful and scholarly follow-up to earlier papers by this group of researchers. Like the other papers in the volume, this work has strong theoretical foundations with unambiguous clinical ramifications. Steve Long provides the readers with an analysis of four language analysis procedures performed automatically. This paper will assist practitioners in selecting appropriate language sample procedures, and will provide clinicians with a general model of decision-making that should serve their needs for many years. Marilyn A. Nippold examines idiom understanding in preadolescents. The importance of understanding individual differences emerges as one reads this important work. The implications of this thoughtful study are clearly delineated.
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