Parental Recasts and Production of Copulas and Articles by Children With Specific Language Impairment and Typical Language In intervention, children with specific language impairment (SLI) have been shown to develop productive use of morphemes in response to target-specific recasts at rates generally equivalent to younger, language-matched children with typical language development (TL). Our previous work demonstrated that in conversation, the overall recast rates produced by parents of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2001
Parental Recasts and Production of Copulas and Articles by Children With Specific Language Impairment and Typical Language
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Kerry Proctor-Williams
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Marc E. Fey
    University of Kansas Medical Center, Kansas City
  • Diane Frome Loeb
    University of Kansas, Lawrence
  • Contact author: Kerry Proctor-Williams, PhD, Hearing and Speech Department, University of Kansas Medical Center, 3031 Miller Building, 3901 Rainbow Blvd. Kansas City, KS 66160–7605. E-mail: kprowil@ukans.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2001
Parental Recasts and Production of Copulas and Articles by Children With Specific Language Impairment and Typical Language
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2001, Vol. 10, 155-168. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/015)
History: Received August 29, 2000 , Accepted January 30, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2001, Vol. 10, 155-168. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/015)
History: Received August 29, 2000; Accepted January 30, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 34

In intervention, children with specific language impairment (SLI) have been shown to develop productive use of morphemes in response to target-specific recasts at rates generally equivalent to younger, language-matched children with typical language development (TL). Our previous work demonstrated that in conversation, the overall recast rates produced by parents of children with SLI and those with TL are similar. Still, despite their apparently typical ability to use recast input in intervention and their equivalent environmental exposure to recasts, children with SLI continue to demonstrate grammatical delays in comparison to children with TL.

The purpose of this study was to examine three possible resolutions to this paradox. We examined target-specific copula and article recast usage by 10 parents of children with SLI and 10 parents of younger language-matched children with TL, and we examined their children’s productions of these same forms at three points across an 8-month period. The results provide strong support only for the third of the proposed hypotheses. Contrary to the predictions of the first hypothesis, a strong, positive relation was observed between the copula recasts used by parents of children with TL at Time 1 and their children’s use of copulas 8 months later. On the other hand, correlations between recasts of articles by parents and later production of articles by their children were not statistically reliable. Contrary to the second hypothesis, parents of children with SLI and those with TL produced equivalent rates of article and copula recasts. The third hypothesis received support on two essential counts. First, although significant correlations were found between parental recasts of copulas and production of this form 8 months later for the children with TL, no such relations were observed for the group with SLI. Second, the rate of parental target-specific recasts was less than a quarter of the rate provided in the successful intervention of Camarata, Nelson, and Camarata (1994). We conclude that children with SLI can benefit substantially from the grammar-facilitating properties of recasts, but only when the recasts are presented at rates that are much greater than those available in typical conversations with young children.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported (in part) by research grant # R01 DC 01817 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, awarded to Marc E. Fey and Diane F. Loeb; by center grant HD02528 from the National Institute on Child Health and Human Development; and by a doctoral training grant from KidsAction Research, Canada, awarded to Kerry Proctor-Williams. The authors gratefully acknowledge the assistance of Jayne Brandel, Bonnie Johnson, P. J. Seymour, and Tracy Krulik in all aspects of this study. We also thank Tim Brackenbury, Jennifer Chaffee, Michelle Christman, Bonny Diederich, Michelle Dover, Jane Gillette, Jennifer Lay, Steven Long, Heather Meyer, Melissa Meyer, Tasha Pearson, Tracie Peck, Stephanie Pickert, Rachel Pratte, Dena Reuter, Dan Ruhnke, Rebecca Schmalz, Christy Schneller, Kerri Schreiber, and Shari Sokol for their help with data collection and/or transcription. We are particularly appreciative of the time and effort generously provided by parents and children who participated in this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access