Reducing Test Bias Through Dynamic Assessment of Children's Word Learning Ability This study examined the performance of preschool children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, both typically developing and with low language ability, on a word-learning task. A pretest-teach-posttest method was used to compare a mediation group to a no-mediation group. Children in the mediation group were taught naming strategies using ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 2001
Reducing Test Bias Through Dynamic Assessment of Children's Word Learning Ability
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth Peña
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Aquiles Iglesias
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
  • Carol S. Lidz
    Touro College, New York, NY
  • Contact author: Elizabeth Peña, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 2504 Whitis, Austin, TX 78705.
    Contact author: Elizabeth Peña, PhD, Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, 2504 Whitis, Austin, TX 78705.×
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   May 01, 2001
Reducing Test Bias Through Dynamic Assessment of Children's Word Learning Ability
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2001, Vol. 10, 138-154. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/014)
History: Received October 16, 2000 , Accepted January 19, 2001
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 2001, Vol. 10, 138-154. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/014)
History: Received October 16, 2000; Accepted January 19, 2001
Web of Science® Times Cited: 73

This study examined the performance of preschool children from culturally and linguistically diverse backgrounds, both typically developing and with low language ability, on a word-learning task. A pretest-teach-posttest method was used to compare a mediation group to a no-mediation group. Children in the mediation group were taught naming strategies using mediated learning experience (MLE). Results indicated that typically developing and low language ability children were differentiated on the basis of pretest-posttest change and that dynamic measures (e.g., posttest scores of single-word labeling and modifiability ratings from the mediation sessions) predicted the ability groups better than static measures (e.g., pretest scores of single-word labeling, description, and academic concepts). These results suggest that dynamic assessment approaches may effectively differentiate language difference from language disorder.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a grant from the National Institutes of Health grant (NIDCD) DC0014102, awarded to Dr. Elizabeth Peña. The authors would like to thank Rena Krakow and Vera Gutierrez-Clellen for their thoughtful comments on earlier drafts of this work. We gratefully acknowledge the cooperation and participation of the Head Start Program administrators, teachers, and children at the various centers, who provided us with valuable experiences and information. In addition, we acknowledge the contributions of the following individuals in collecting data: Maggie Campbell, Kristin Youngdahl, Michele Aurignac, Pnina Siegler, Maria Maunez, Janet Quiñones, and Brian Goldstein.
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