Interpretation of Fables and Proverbs by African Americans With and Without Aphasia There is a paucity of performance information for African American adults with aphasia on appraisal tasks, especially in comparison with performance by neurologically normal African American adults. We administered language impairment, functional communication, and discourse measures to neurologically normal African American adults and African American adults with aphasia. The neurologically ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2001
Interpretation of Fables and Proverbs by African Americans With and Without Aphasia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hanna K. Ulatowska
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Robert T. Wertz
    Veterans Administration Medical Center and Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Sandra B. Chapman
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
  • CaSaundra L. Hill
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Jennifer L. Thompson
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Molly W. Keebler
    Baylor University Medical Center, Dallas, TX
  • Gloria Streit Olness
    Callier Center for Communication Disorders, University of Texas at Dallas
  • Sharon D. Parsons
    Parkland Health and Hospital System, Dallas, TX
  • Teya Miller
    Evanston NW Healthcare, Chicago, IL
  • Linda L. Auther
    Veterans Administration Medical Center, Nashville, TN
  • Contact author: Hanna K. Ulatowska, PhD, UTD/Callier Center for Communication Disorders, 1966 Inwood Road, Dallas, TX 75235. E-mail: hanna@utdallas.edu
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2001
Interpretation of Fables and Proverbs by African Americans With and Without Aphasia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2001, Vol. 10, 40-50. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/007)
History: Received March 15, 2000 , Accepted November 9, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2001, Vol. 10, 40-50. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/007)
History: Received March 15, 2000; Accepted November 9, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

There is a paucity of performance information for African American adults with aphasia on appraisal tasks, especially in comparison with performance by neurologically normal African American adults. We administered language impairment, functional communication, and discourse measures to neurologically normal African American adults and African American adults with aphasia. The neurologically normal group performed significantly better on the language impairment measure (Western Aphasia Battery), the functional communication measure (ASHA Functional Assessment of Communication Skills for Adults), providing the lesson in a fable discourse task, and spontaneous interpretation of proverbs. No significant differences between groups were observed on a picture description fable task or in performance on a multiple-choice proverb task. Few significant relationships were observed among measures in the neurologically normal group; however, the group with aphasia displayed a variety of significant relationships in their performance on the language impairment, functional communication, fable lesson, and interpretation of proverbs tasks. The results imply that fable and proverb discourse tasks may be valuable supplemental measures for characterizing communicative competence in African American adults who have aphasia.

Author Note
This research was supported by the Department of Veterans Affairs Rehabilitation Research and Development Service.
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