Final Thoughts on Management of Aphasia in the Early Phases of Recovery Following Stroke In our paper (Holland & Fridriksson, 2000) we presented some ideas on how speech-language pathologists might maximize their resources in acute care. Our approach highlights patient and family counseling, rather than focusing on impairment-based treatment. Our clinical experience as well as some relevant data support this view. In his ... Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   February 01, 2001
Final Thoughts on Management of Aphasia in the Early Phases of Recovery Following Stroke
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julius Fridriksson
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Audrey Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Audrey Holland, PhD, Dept. of Speech and Hearing Sciences, P.O. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721–0071
    Contact author: Audrey Holland, PhD, Dept. of Speech and Hearing Sciences, P.O. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721–0071×
Article Information
Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   February 01, 2001
Final Thoughts on Management of Aphasia in the Early Phases of Recovery Following Stroke
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2001, Vol. 10, 37-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/006)
History: Received November 1, 2000 , Accepted November 2, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2001, Vol. 10, 37-39. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/006)
History: Received November 1, 2000; Accepted November 2, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3
Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders.
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