Aphasia Management During the Early Phases of Recovery Following Stroke Training in speech-language pathology seldom distinguishes treatment of aphasia in its early phases from treatment that occurs when aphasia has become more chronic. In many ways such training may not adequately prepare clinicians for their earliest encounters with newly aphasic people. Marshall (1997) suggests that the focus of early ... Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   February 01, 2001
Aphasia Management During the Early Phases of Recovery Following Stroke
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Audrey Holland
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Julius Fridriksson
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Contact author: Audrey Holland, PhD, Dept. of Speech and Hearing Sciences, P.O. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721–0071
    Contact author: Audrey Holland, PhD, Dept. of Speech and Hearing Sciences, P.O. Box 210071, University of Arizona, Tucson, AZ 85721–0071×
Article Information
Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   February 01, 2001
Aphasia Management During the Early Phases of Recovery Following Stroke
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2001, Vol. 10, 19-28. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/004)
History: Received January 28, 2000 , Accepted October 16, 2000
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2001, Vol. 10, 19-28. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2001/004)
History: Received January 28, 2000; Accepted October 16, 2000
Web of Science® Times Cited: 24
Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Multipurpose Research and Training Center Grant DC-01409 from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and by National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke Grant NS17495-03.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access