Potential Cultural Bias in Training Parents as Conversational Partners With Their Children Who Have Delays in Language Development This article explores the potential cultural biases in language intervention approaches that train parents to interact with their children who have language delays in ways that will promote language development. The goals of such programs are solidly grounded in research on parent-child interaction. However, these studies have focused almost exclusively ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   January 01, 1994
Potential Cultural Bias in Training Parents as Conversational Partners With Their Children Who Have Delays in Language Development
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Anne van Kleeck, PhD
    Department of Speech Communication, University of Texas, Austin, TX 78712-1089
Article Information
Development / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Normal Language Processing / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   January 01, 1994
Potential Cultural Bias in Training Parents as Conversational Partners With Their Children Who Have Delays in Language Development
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 67-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.67
History: Received June 8, 1992 , Accepted August 20, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 67-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.67
History: Received June 8, 1992; Accepted August 20, 1993

This article explores the potential cultural biases in language intervention approaches that train parents to interact with their children who have language delays in ways that will promote language development. The goals of such programs are solidly grounded in research on parent-child interaction. However, these studies have focused almost exclusively on white, middle-class families. Therefore, the goals reflect underlying values and beliefs that are not shared by all cultural groups. This article highlights the cultural assumptions that underlie these programs by considering research on language socialization in a variety of nondominant American and non-American cultures and social groups. Culturally relativevalues, beliefs, and practices underlying parentchild interaction are explored in the areas of (1) aspects of social organization related to interaction, (2) the value of talk, (3) how status is handled in interaction, (4) beliefs about intentionality, and (5) beliefs about teaching language to children. Finally, clinical implications are explored.

Acknowledgments
The ideas in this article first emerged as the P de V Pienaar Memorial Lecture delivered at The University of Witwatersrand in July 1992 and sponsored by the South African Speech-Language-Hearing Association. The author wishes to thank Victoria Joffe, Robyn Lewis, Glen Jager, Frida Rundell, and many other South Africans for their inspiration. Additionally, many insightful comments were offered by Associate Editor Brenda Terrell and two anonymous reviewers. Their assistance in helping the author strengthen and clarify her thinking on the ideas presented here is gratefully acknowledged. And last but not least, the author wishes to extend her continuing gratitude to a dear friend and colleague, Alice Richardson. Her input on this article was given, as usual, both willingly and brilliantly.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access