Assessment of Preschool Narrative Skills The assessment of discourse skills in young children is an important responsibility facing clinicians today. Early identification of problems in discourse skills and, more specifically, narrative abilities is especially important for identifying children at risk for later learning and literacy-related difficulties. Despite this, few tools are available for assessing narrative ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   January 01, 1994
Assessment of Preschool Narrative Skills
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Allyssa McCabe, PhD
    University of Massachusetts-Lowell, and Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA, Harvard University, HGSE, 3rd Floor, Roy E. Larsen Hall, Appian Way, Cambridge, MA 02138-3752
  • Pamela Rosenthal Rollins
    Harvard Graduate School of Education, Cambridge, MA, and Braintree Hospital Pediatric Center, Braintree, MA
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / School-Based Settings / Normal Language Processing / Language Disorders / Specific Language Impairment / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   January 01, 1994
Assessment of Preschool Narrative Skills
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 45-56. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.45
History: Received April 22, 1992 , Accepted August 24, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 45-56. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.45
History: Received April 22, 1992; Accepted August 24, 1993

The assessment of discourse skills in young children is an important responsibility facing clinicians today. Early identification of problems in discourse skills and, more specifically, narrative abilities is especially important for identifying children at risk for later learning and literacy-related difficulties. Despite this, few tools are available for assessing narrative skills in preschoolers. In this article we provide information concerning preschool narrative development in typically developing, North American, Caucasian, English-speaking children. Methods are suggested for assessing narrative skill of children with language impairment and children developing language normally. Transcripts of narratives from these children are presented, along with specific recommendations for evaluating these narratives.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this article were presented at a miniseminar during the annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Atlanta in November 1991. We gratefully acknowledge Lydia Greene and Laurie Bozzi for performing reliability estimates and for their very helpful suggestions. We would also like to acknowledge Nickola Nelson and Marilyn Newhoff for their helpful editing.
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