Social Support in Laryngeal Cancer Survivors Voice and Adjustment Issues Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   January 01, 1994
Social Support in Laryngeal Cancer Survivors
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gordon W. Blood, PhD
    Pennsylvania State University, University Park
    Department of Communication Disorders, 110 Moore Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16807
  • Kathleen C. Simpson
    Pennsylvania State University, University Park
  • Susan C. Raimondi
    Crossroads Speech and Hearing, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Mary Dineen
    St. Petersburg, FL
  • Susan M. Kauffman
    Hahnemann Hospital, Philadelphia, PA
  • Kimberly A. Stagaard
    Valley Rehabilitation Associates, Allentown, PA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Special Populations / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   January 01, 1994
Social Support in Laryngeal Cancer Survivors
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 37-44. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.37
History: Received March 27, 1992 , Accepted May 10, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 37-44. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.37
History: Received March 27, 1992; Accepted May 10, 1993

Patients who had laryngectomies were grouped according to adjustment scales into "good copers" and "poorer copers." More than 70% of the laryngeal cancer survivors were well adjusted and classified as "good copers." Three social support scales were administered and revealed that "good copers" perceived themselves as having better quality networks and more functional support. A subjective self-evaluation of the subjects’ voices revealed a relationship between perceived voice quality, adjustment, and perceived social support. Rehabilitation for some patients with laryngectomies may need to include more direct nurturing; speech-language pathologists may want to suggest self-help groups or professional support counseling.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a John Scripps research grant to the Head and Neck Cancer Rehabilitation Center, Indianapolis, IN; a W. K. Kellogg Foundation National Leadership Fellowship; and a Gerontology Center Initiation Grant at The Pennsylvania State University awarded to the first author.
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