The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists as Manufacturers’ Representatives in AAC Four Responses Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   January 01, 1994
The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists as Manufacturers’ Representatives in AAC
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Diane Bristow
    6241 ½ Nita Avenue, Woodland Hills, CA 91367
  • Judith Frumkin
    4303 Hepatica Hill, Manlius, NY 13104
  • Barry Romich
    Chair, Prentke Romich Company, 1022 Heyl Road, Wooster, OH 44691
  • Walt Woltosz
    President, Words+, 40015 Sierra Highway, Building B145, Palmdale, CA 93550
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   January 01, 1994
The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists as Manufacturers’ Representatives in AAC
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 19-24. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.19
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 19-24. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.19
Bristow Responds:
The issue of manufacturer representation in the field of AAC is broader than just the employment of speech-language pathologists, as Walt Woltosz identified. The quality of that representation may vary whether the representative has a background as a speech-language pathologist or as a salesperson. What remains consistent, however, is the structure imposed by the company. Will the MR be independent and represent a multitude of products from various companies? Or does that person represent only one company and its products? Further, does that company encourage its representative to inform the AAC user of professionals providing AAC service and the need for a comprehensive evaluation and subsequent training?
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