The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists as Manufacturers’ Representatives in AAC Four Opinions Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   January 01, 1994
The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists as Manufacturers’ Representatives in AAC
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Walter S. Woltosz
    Words+, Lancaster, CA
  • Diane C. Bristow
    Woodland Hills, CA
  • Judith R. Frumkin
    Syracuse, NY
  • Barry Romich
    Wooster, OH
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Special Populations / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   January 01, 1994
The Role of Speech-Language Pathologists as Manufacturers’ Representatives in AAC
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 11-18. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.11
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1994, Vol. 3, 11-18. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0301.11
Woltosz:
Persons with backgrounds in speech-language pathology sometimes act as manufacturer’s representatives (MRs) for augmentative and alternative communication (AAC) equipment. As with other backgrounds, they are in the minority—no one background constitutes a majority. This is consistent with the practice of AAC in the field in general. Speech-language pathology is a component of AAC as much as occupational therapy, rehabilitation engineering, computer science, special education, and perhaps several others. There is a difference in perception, however, when the MR is a speech-language pathologist. This difference in perception, on the part of both consumers and clinicians working in the field, presents a very real danger.
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