Development and Assessment of a Scale Addressing Communication Needs of Patients With Laryngectomies This article deals with the development and assessment of the Self-Evaluation of Communication Experiences After Laryngectomy (SECEL), a 35-item scale developed to address the communication needs of patients with laryngectomies. In the initial stages of development of SECEL, 431 patients with laryngectomies participated. Scale development, factor structure, and data reduction ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1993
Development and Assessment of a Scale Addressing Communication Needs of Patients With Laryngectomies
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gordon W. Blood, PhD
    110 Moore Building, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16807
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1993
Development and Assessment of a Scale Addressing Communication Needs of Patients With Laryngectomies
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 82-90. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.82
History: Received January 2, 1992 , Accepted April 7, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 82-90. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.82
History: Received January 2, 1992; Accepted April 7, 1993

This article deals with the development and assessment of the Self-Evaluation of Communication Experiences After Laryngectomy (SECEL), a 35-item scale developed to address the communication needs of patients with laryngectomies. In the initial stages of development of SECEL, 431 patients with laryngectomies participated. Scale development, factor structure, and data reduction are discussed. Statistical analyses revealed three factors representing General, Environment, and Attitude Subscales. The final version of the SECEL was administered to another 102 patients with laryngectomies to determine validity and reliability measurements. The scale provides a useful measure of adjustment related to communication experiences of patients with laryngectomies.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a John Scripps Research Grant, Head and Neck Cancer Rehabilitation Center, Indianapolis, IN; a W. K. Kellogg Foundation National Leadership Fellowship; and a Gerontology Center Initiation Grant to the Pennsylvania State University. Special thanks to Kimberly Amant, Mark Ceglio, Susan Doherty, Mary Fleury, Stacie Ingerman, Susan Kaufman, Amy Luther, David McNaughton, and Kathy Cook Simpson for their assistance in transcribing videotapes, mailing questionnaires, and setting up the computer programs. I would also like to express my appreciation to Patricia Tate for her invaluable help in the manuscript preparation.
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