Personal Computers as Augmentative and Alternative Communication Aids Traditionally, high technology aids have been viewed as either PC-based communication aids or dedicated augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) aids. In the past, PCs were stationary and very difficult to transport and thus were differentiated from AAC communication aids. However, with the new generation of PC-based aids, there appear ... Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult  |   September 01, 1993
Personal Computers as Augmentative and Alternative Communication Aids
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Mizuko, PhD
    University of Minnesota, Duluth, 242 Montague Hall, 10 University Drive, Duluth, MN 55812
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult   |   September 01, 1993
Personal Computers as Augmentative and Alternative Communication Aids
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 8-10. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.08
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 8-10. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.08
Traditionally, high technology aids have been viewed as either PC-based communication aids or dedicated augmentative and alternative communication (ACC) aids. In the past, PCs were stationary and very difficult to transport and thus were differentiated from AAC communication aids. However, with the new generation of PC-based aids, there appear to be fewer functional differences between the dedicated aids and PCs. Both technologies can offer high quality speech synthesis, limitless vocabulary, multiple input modes, printer capabilities, and portability.
When adapted with special hardware and software, PCs now provide viable solutions for individuals who are unable to speak and/or write through natural modes. One major advantage to using this type of communication aid is cost. In most instances the cost of a PC and the software designed to turn a PC into a communication aid is generally less expensive than the cost of a dedicated communication aid, though this may not hold up as other peripherals are added on the PC to provide nontraditional access to the PC. Because this approach utilizes a PC and specialized software, it may be easier to justify the hardware expenses, since the PC-based aid can serve the functions of both a dedicated communication aid and a PC. Also, because much of the AAC part of the PC is software-based, it is more cost-effective to update or change the software than to replace dedicated AAC equipment.
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