Simultaneously Treating Stuttering and Disordered Phonology in Children Experimental Treatment, Preliminary Findings Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 1993
Simultaneously Treating Stuttering and Disordered Phonology in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Edward G. Conture, PhD
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
    Program in Communication Sciences and Disorders, Syracuse University, 805 South Crouse Avenue, Syracuse, NY 13244–2280
  • Linda J. Louko
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Mary Louise Edwards
    Syracuse University, Syracuse, NY
  • Now affiliated with the State University of New York, Cortland.
    Now affiliated with the State University of New York, Cortland.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 1993
Simultaneously Treating Stuttering and Disordered Phonology in Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 72-81. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.72
History: Received June 8, 1992 , Accepted May 5, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 72-81. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.72
History: Received June 8, 1992; Accepted May 5, 1993

The purpose of this article is to describe treatment designed to simultaneously treat disordered phonology and stuttering in children who exhibit both disorders and to compare changes in stuttering that result from this treatment to changes observed in treatment designed for children who exhibit stuttering but not disordered phonology. Subjects were eight monolingual, English-speaking children: 4 boys who exhibited both stuttering and disordered phonology (mean age=69.7 months) and who participated in a stuttering-phonology (SP) treatment group, as well as 3 boys and 1 girl who exhibited only stuttering (mean age=71.5 months) and who participated in a stuttering (S) treatment group. Both treatment groups met weekly in 1-hour group treatment sessions for one calendar year. Results indicate that stuttering behavior changed appreciably for 2 of the children in the SP treatment group and for 3 children in the S group. In addition, 3 of the children in the SP group made appreciable changes in their phonological processes. Findings are taken to suggest that simultaneously treating childhood stuttering and disordered phonology is both feasible and effective, but there remains a need for further refinement in the methods used to treat the two disorders when they co-occur in children.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by a NIDCD/NIH research grant (DC00523) to Syracuse University. The authors would like to extend their thanks to Lesley Wolk for her seminal work at Syracuse University in the development of treatment procedures for treating children who exhibit both stuttering and disordered phonology, Lisa LaSalle and Michael McSheehan for assistance with data analysis, and the many children and their parents whom we’ve had the good fortune to interact with and learn from.
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