Consumer-Oriented Evaluation of Interactive Language Intervention Thirty-two mothers of preschool-aged children with developmental delay participated in a parent-focused language intervention program that espoused an interactive approach. Consumer satisfaction data (i.e., subjective measures [parent ratings] and objective measures [attendance, home assignment completion]) revealed parental satisfaction with the quality of service, thus confirming the social validity of this ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   September 01, 1993
Consumer-Oriented Evaluation of Interactive Language Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Luigi Girolametto, PhD
    Graduate Department of Speech Pathology, University of Toronto, Tanz Neuroscience Building, 6 Queen’s Park Crescent West, Toronto, Ontario, Canada M5G 1A8
  • Rosemary Tannock
    Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Ontario
  • Linda Siegel
    Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, Toronto
Article Information
Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Language Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   September 01, 1993
Consumer-Oriented Evaluation of Interactive Language Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 41-51. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.41
History: Received August 3, 1992 , Accepted May 3, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 41-51. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.41
History: Received August 3, 1992; Accepted May 3, 1993

Thirty-two mothers of preschool-aged children with developmental delay participated in a parent-focused language intervention program that espoused an interactive approach. Consumer satisfaction data (i.e., subjective measures [parent ratings] and objective measures [attendance, home assignment completion]) revealed parental satisfaction with the quality of service, thus confirming the social validity of this treatment approach. All parents reported improvements in their interactions with their children, but were equivocal about improvements in their children’s communication skills. Developmental level of the child at entry did not influence program acceptability or outcome ratings. No significant associations were found between what the parents subjectively reported and objective change data coded from pre- and post-intervention videotapes. We conclude that while consumer satisfaction surveys provide valuable information on the quality of service offered, they are inadequate as sole measures of treatment outcome.

Acknowledgments
The work reported in this article was supported by a program of the Ministry of Community and Social Services, Ontario, administered by the Research and Program Evaluation Unit in cooperation with the Ontario Mental Health Foundation and funded from the MCSS Research Grants Program. The second author was supported, in part, by a postdoctoral fellowship from the Ontario Mental Health Foundation. The authors would like to thank Ruth Gannon, Janice Greenberg, and Joanne Nelson of the Hugh MacMillan Medical Centre, and Ayala Manolson, Farla Klaiman, and Dale Reid of the Hanen Early Language Parent Program for their careful administration of the treatment programs. The comments and helpful suggestions of Don Bailey, M. Jeanne Wilcox, and two anonymous reviewers on an earlier version of this paper are acknowledged. The authors are especially grateful to the families who participated in this project and gave freely of their time to complete the questionnaires.
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