A Simplified Clinical Procedure for the Acquisition of Photoglottographic Waveforms From Children and Adults This article describes the development and use of a simplified clinical procedure for the acquisition of photoglottographic (PGG) waveforms. Using this method, five normal children (6–12 years of age) and five normal young adults (21–34 years of age) were assessed. Evaluation of this simplified PGG acquisition method revealed that PGG ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   September 01, 1993
A Simplified Clinical Procedure for the Acquisition of Photoglottographic Waveforms From Children and Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Philip C. Doyle, PhD
    Department of Communicative Disorders, Elborn College, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6G 1H1
  • Stephen C. Fraser
    Dalhousie University, Halifax, Nova Scotia
  • Currently affiliated with the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Chedoke-McMaster Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada
    Currently affiliated with the Department of Speech-Language Pathology, Chedoke-McMaster Hospital, Hamilton, Ontario, Canada×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   September 01, 1993
A Simplified Clinical Procedure for the Acquisition of Photoglottographic Waveforms From Children and Adults
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 36-40. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.36
History: Received June 8, 1992 , Accepted May 10, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 36-40. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.36
History: Received June 8, 1992; Accepted May 10, 1993

This article describes the development and use of a simplified clinical procedure for the acquisition of photoglottographic (PGG) waveforms. Using this method, five normal children (6–12 years of age) and five normal young adults (21–34 years of age) were assessed. Evaluation of this simplified PGG acquisition method revealed that PGG waveforms were obtained without difficulty from all 10 subjects. The method outlined is safe and simple for use with children and adults, as well as time-effective. These findings suggest that utilization of PGG in the clinical setting is quite feasible when the current procedure is employed. Additionally, issues pertaining to the effectiveness and feasibility of using this method as a standard clinical procedure for diagnostic purposes are discussed.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this article were presented at the annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Atlanta, GA, in November 1991.
The authors would like to thank Jill Were, Mary Lou Kavanaugh, and Joe Kalinowski for their help in various stages of this project; Andy Leeper for his review of an earlier version; and Donna Costello for her kind and careful assistance with manuscript preparation. We also wish to thank the subjects, particularly the children, who participated in this study, and their parents for their interest and cooperation.
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