Differential Treatment of Phonological Disability in Children With Impaired Hearing Who Were Trained Orally The efficacy of differential treatment of phonological disability was studied in children with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairments who presented with both phonetic and phonemic error types. Two treatments were administered to four subjects aged 5:0 to 10:5 with prelinguistic hearing impairment who had been trained orally. Phonetic treatment ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   September 01, 1993
Differential Treatment of Phonological Disability in Children With Impaired Hearing Who Were Trained Orally
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Suzanne Abraham, PhD
    Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York City, Montefiore Medical Center, Department of Otolaryngology, Gold Zone/Room 119, 111 East 210th Street, Bronx, NY 10467.
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   September 01, 1993
Differential Treatment of Phonological Disability in Children With Impaired Hearing Who Were Trained Orally
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 23-30. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.23
History: Received March 25, 1992 , Accepted April 7, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 23-30. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.23
History: Received March 25, 1992; Accepted April 7, 1993

The efficacy of differential treatment of phonological disability was studied in children with moderate to severe sensorineural hearing impairments who presented with both phonetic and phonemic error types. Two treatments were administered to four subjects aged 5:0 to 10:5 with prelinguistic hearing impairment who had been trained orally. Phonetic treatment was modeled in accord with an articulation approach using syllable imitation. Phonemic treatment was modeled in accord with a phonological approach using meaningful minimal contrasts. Phonetic targets were consonant singletons; phonemic targets were phonological processes. Within each treatment, one target was trained; the other served as a control. Results indicated a tendency toward improved target production in training and generalization with phonemic treatment. Individual subject differences in training and in generalization were evident for the phonetic treatment. No between-treatment differences in training were found. However, between-treatment differences in generalization were significant. Clinical issues and implications of the findings are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The FM amplification systems for this research project were provided by Telex Corporation. Special thanks to Irene Dereks, Director, Telex Instruments Group, for her continued support.
Preliminary portions of this paper were presented at the annual Conventions of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in Boston, November 1989, and Seattle, November 1990.
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