Chronic Perseverative Stuttering Syndrome Constructive or Casuistic? Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   September 01, 1993
Chronic Perseverative Stuttering Syndrome
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard E. Ham, PhD
    Department of Communicative Disorders, Florida State University, 401B RRC, Tallahassee, FL 32306
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   September 01, 1993
Chronic Perseverative Stuttering Syndrome
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 16-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.16
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1993, Vol. 2, 16-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0203.16
After reading Cooper’s article, and rereading the original 1986 article, I went to my bookshelf and found Eugene Hahn’s (1943) compilation of authorities in Stuttering, Significant Theories and Therapies. It had been my first text in stuttering my junior year in college. I waded through 15 American and 8 European authorities. Some spoke of “cures”; others did not. At that time, looking for a simple answer, I was not comforted by Hahn’s closing statement on the last page (p. 167): “Those using a particular theory and its accompanying treatment cannot claim to cure all stutterers, nor can they find a cause in every stuttering case which will coincide with their theory. The problem of causation and treatment of stuttering remains a challenging one.”
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