Phoneme Effects on Vocal Effort and Vocal Quality This study demonstrated that "vocal effort" is a legitimate laryngeal perception that can be detected by many subjects who have voice disorders and by some normal control subjects. Further, subjects with voice disorders found that the degree of vocal effort in speech was greatest for voiceless obstruent consonants, followed by ... Research Article
Research Article  |   May 01, 1993
Phoneme Effects on Vocal Effort and Vocal Quality
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Watterson, PhD
    University of Nevada-Reno, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology/152, 152 Redfield Building, Reno, NV 89557
  • Stephen C. McFarlane
    University of Nevada-Reno, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology/152, 152 Redfield Building, Reno, NV 89557
  • Kari L. Diamond
    University of Nevada-Reno, Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology/152, 152 Redfield Building, Reno, NV 89557
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Article
Research Article   |   May 01, 1993
Phoneme Effects on Vocal Effort and Vocal Quality
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 74-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.74
History: Received January 21, 1992 , Accepted January 5, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 74-78. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.74
History: Received January 21, 1992; Accepted January 5, 1993

This study demonstrated that "vocal effort" is a legitimate laryngeal perception that can be detected by many subjects who have voice disorders and by some normal control subjects. Further, subjects with voice disorders found that the degree of vocal effort in speech was greatest for voiceless obstruent consonants, followed by voiced obstruents; sonorants and nasals required the least effort. A panel of listeners, however, could not detect differences in roughness, breathiness, intonation, or overall vocal quality as the perceived vocal effort varied.

Acknowledgments
This paper was presented in part at the annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in November 1990, in Seattle.
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