Counseling Parents of Children Who Stutter To create a verbal environment that facilitates children’s speech fluency, parents of children who stutter may need to rely on suggestions from speech-language pathologists. However, it appears that implementing changes in these parent-child verbal interactions is not the only area in which counseling is needed. Parents also need to discuss ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   May 01, 1993
Counseling Parents of Children Who Stutter
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia M. Zebrowski, PhD
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242
  • Robert L. Schum
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology, Wendell Johnson Speech and Hearing Center, The University of Iowa, Iowa City, IA 52242
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   May 01, 1993
Counseling Parents of Children Who Stutter
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 65-73. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.65
History: Received November 14, 1991 , Accepted August 31, 1992
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 65-73. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.65
History: Received November 14, 1991; Accepted August 31, 1992

To create a verbal environment that facilitates children’s speech fluency, parents of children who stutter may need to rely on suggestions from speech-language pathologists. However, it appears that implementing changes in these parent-child verbal interactions is not the only area in which counseling is needed. Parents also need to discuss a number of concerns, apart from those specifically related to verbal interactions with the children, to help parents understand and adapt to the unique problems associated with children’s stuttering. The purpose of this article is to combine a broad overview of several basic counseling principles with information about specific areas of concern that these parents often present to speech-language pathologists. These concerns are organized into three areas: (a) emotional and behavioral parental responses, (b) parental concerns about "talking about talking," and (c) parental responses to and concerns about the treatment process.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on a miniseminar presented at the annual Convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association held in Seattle in November 1990. We would like to thank Martin R. Adams, Edward G. Conture, and A. R. Mallard for their helpful reviews of this manuscript.
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