A Clinical Tool for Evaluating the Familial Basis of Speech and Language Disorders Recently, researchers have suggested a familial basis to some speech and language disorders. Although speech-language pathologists have long noted anecdotal reports of family histories for speech and language disorders, they have not routinely or systematically collected this information and utilized it in their clinical practice. This article reports on a ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   May 01, 1993
A Clinical Tool for Evaluating the Familial Basis of Speech and Language Disorders
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara A. Lewis, PhD
    Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Rainbow Babies and Department of Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, 2102 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
  • Lisa Freebairn
    Case Western Reserve University School of Medicine and Rainbow Babies and Department of Pediatrics, Rainbow Babies and Children’s Hospital, 2102 Adelbert Road, Cleveland, OH 44106
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Language Disorders / Reading & Writing Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   May 01, 1993
A Clinical Tool for Evaluating the Familial Basis of Speech and Language Disorders
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 38-43. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.38
History: Received April 27, 1992 , Accepted January 5, 1993
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 38-43. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.38
History: Received April 27, 1992; Accepted January 5, 1993

Recently, researchers have suggested a familial basis to some speech and language disorders. Although speech-language pathologists have long noted anecdotal reports of family histories for speech and language disorders, they have not routinely or systematically collected this information and utilized it in their clinical practice. This article reports on a tool, devised through research, that assesses family history for speech, language, and learning disorders, and that can be used to construct pedigrees. This information may then be used to establish risk for speech and language disorders, to identify children for early intervention programs, and to predict outcome.

Acknowledgments
This research is supported by a grant from the National Institutes of Health, NINCDS Grant No. DC00528. We wish to express our appreciation to all the schools, preschools, and day care centers who provided families for this project, especially Cleveland Hearing and Speech Center, Kenston Public Schools, Lake County Society for Rehabilitation of Children and Adults, St. Francis of Assisi School, and St. Joan of Arc School.
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