Inside In the World View section of this issue, Navas and Pinho share with us some of the stages of development of the disciplines of speech-language pathology and audiology in their native country of Brazil, a development that they acknowledge is in its infancy. Currently, a bachelor’s degree is the ... Editorial
Editorial  |   May 01, 1993
Inside
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   May 01, 1993
Inside
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.02
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1993, Vol. 2, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0202.02
In the World View section of this issue, Navas and Pinho share with us some of the stages of development of the disciplines of speech-language pathology and audiology in their native country of Brazil, a development that they acknowledge is in its infancy. Currently, a bachelor’s degree is the entry-level degree for practice; further, with such a degree one is assumed to be competent to practice within both disciplines simultaneously. With miles to go before we sleep, this piece of information underscores how far we have come as professions concerned with individuals with communication impairments. And with the great distances we have traveled, a tremendous body of literature has become available. Moreover, the breadth of the field is now such that the scope of our practices encompasses not only new approaches to old diagnoses, but the identification of myriad new branches of speech-language disorders, and the concomitant evolution of a scientific base to support our ever-widening service delivery roles. These points are clearly reflected in the contents of the current issue of the American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology.
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