The Removable R-Appliance as a Practice Device to Facilitate Correct Production of /r/ The remediation of /r/articulation errors in school-age children often poses a challenge for speech-language pathologists. This study was designed to investigate whether an appliance placed in the maxillary arch would facilitate the production of /r/, whether intervention with or without a direct auditory model and with or without the appliance ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1993
The Removable R-Appliance as a Practice Device to Facilitate Correct Production of /r/
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Charlene E. Clark, PhD
    Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland
    Child Development and Rehabilitation Center, PO Box 574, Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland, OR 97297-9574
  • Ilsa E. Schwarz
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Robert W. Blakeley
    Oregon Health Sciences University, Portland
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Article
Research Article   |   January 01, 1993
The Removable R-Appliance as a Practice Device to Facilitate Correct Production of /r/
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 84-92. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.84
History: Received April 17, 1991 , Accepted September 21, 1992
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 84-92. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.84
History: Received April 17, 1991; Accepted September 21, 1992

The remediation of /r/articulation errors in school-age children often poses a challenge for speech-language pathologists. This study was designed to investigate whether an appliance placed in the maxillary arch would facilitate the production of /r/, whether intervention with or without a direct auditory model and with or without the appliance would have significant effect on treatment success, and whether the appliance would be a feasible treatment adjunct for speech-language pathologists who treat school-age children. Thirty-six school-age subjects were randomly assigned to one of four treatment groups. Each subject was seen individually for 15 minutes twice weekly for a period of 6 weeks. Results of the study indicated that the R-appliance was considered to be a useful clinical tool by the speech-language pathologists. Statistically significant differences in favor of the children who used the R-appliance, with either treatment model, were noted at all levels of production—sound, word, and spontaneous speech. In addition, at the level of spontaneous speech, the R-appliance combined with the direct auditory model treatment yielded significantly better results than the R-appliance combined with the non-auditory model.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access