A Pilot Study of Relations Among Specific Measures Obtained at Intake and Discharge in a Program of Prevention and Early Intervention for Stuttering Relations are identified among specific measures taken at intake and discharge in an early intervention/prevention program for stuttering. The measures of interest were: waiting period between identification of a "problem" and onset of treatment, child’s age, articulatory rate of parents and child, number of questions asked by parents, number of ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   January 01, 1993
A Pilot Study of Relations Among Specific Measures Obtained at Intake and Discharge in a Program of Prevention and Early Intervention for Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • C. Woodruff Starkweather, PhD
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
    Department of Speech-Language-Hearing, Temple University, Philadelphia, PA 19122
  • Sheryl Ridener Gottwald
    Temple University, Philadelphia, PA
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   January 01, 1993
A Pilot Study of Relations Among Specific Measures Obtained at Intake and Discharge in a Program of Prevention and Early Intervention for Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 51-58. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.51
History: Received November 25, 1991 , Accepted October 5, 1992
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 51-58. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.51
History: Received November 25, 1991; Accepted October 5, 1992

Relations are identified among specific measures taken at intake and discharge in an early intervention/prevention program for stuttering. The measures of interest were: waiting period between identification of a "problem" and onset of treatment, child’s age, articulatory rate of parents and child, number of questions asked by parents, number of interruptions of child by parents, and the child’s percentage of discontinuous speech time. The relations observed suggest the importance of beginning treatment for stuttering as soon as possible and the possibility of a pattern of parental reaction to discontinuous speech in children.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access