Classroom-Based Phonological Intervention The value of language intervention conducted in the classroom setting has been discussed in several recent articles (e.g., Damico, 1987; Fujiki & Brinton, 1984; Miller, 1989; Norris, 1989; Wilcox, Kouri, & Caswell, 1991). Classroom-based treatment allows the speech-language pathologist to use academic programs as a framework for language intervention services. ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   January 01, 1993
Classroom-Based Phonological Intervention
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Julie J. Masterson, PhD
    Department of Communication Disorders, Southwest Missouri State University, 901 South National, Springfield, MO 65804
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / School-Based Settings / Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   January 01, 1993
Classroom-Based Phonological Intervention
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 5-9. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.05
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 5-9. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.05
The value of language intervention conducted in the classroom setting has been discussed in several recent articles (e.g., Damico, 1987; Fujiki & Brinton, 1984; Miller, 1989; Norris, 1989; Wilcox, Kouri, & Caswell, 1991). Classroom-based treatment allows the speech-language pathologist to use academic programs as a framework for language intervention services. For the school-age child, textbooks, homework, and classroom discourse can serve as sources from which to draw intervention goals and procedures. For the preschool child, typical classroom activities, such as crafts, snacks, and toileting, provide a rich context in which to target desired linguistic structures. Among the advantages cited for classroom-based instruction are increased relevance of linguistic targets; additional opportunities to learn the social dynamics of group settings, including turn-taking conventions and listening skills; and cost effectiveness. Further, conducting intervention sessions within the classroom allows the teacher to become familiar with language goals and procedures that will facilitate language growth. This model of service delivery is also thought to promote generalization. Wilcox, Kouri, and Caswell (1991)  compared lexical acquisition in preschoolers seen in individual treatment versus classroom settings. Children in both groups improved; however, the children seen in the classroom program used more of the targeted lexical items in their home environments. Wilcox et al. concluded that the classroom environment promoted increased generalization of language skills.
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