Imitation of Suprasegmental Patterns by Non-Native Speakers of English Speakers with limited English proficiency (LEP) usually produce a combination of articulation errors and differences in the prosodic patterns of English. There are abundant measures of articulation, but few objective measures of prosodic performance. The Tennessee Test of Rhythm and Intonation Patterns (TRIP) was selected as a potential measure for ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   January 01, 1993
Imitation of Suprasegmental Patterns by Non-Native Speakers of English
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy Jeanne Haak, PhD
    Auburn University, AL
    1199 Haley Center, Auburn University, AL 36849
  • Rieko Marie Darling
    Auburn University, AL
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   January 01, 1993
Imitation of Suprasegmental Patterns by Non-Native Speakers of English
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 47-50. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.47
History: Received March 3, 1992 , Accepted August 31, 1992
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 47-50. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.47
History: Received March 3, 1992; Accepted August 31, 1992

Speakers with limited English proficiency (LEP) usually produce a combination of articulation errors and differences in the prosodic patterns of English. There are abundant measures of articulation, but few objective measures of prosodic performance. The Tennessee Test of Rhythm and Intonation Patterns (TRIP) was selected as a potential measure for distinguishing the prosodic patterns of native and non-native English. First, the TRIP was given to 12 native speakers of Asiatic languages and 12 native speakers of English. The performances of the two groups did not differ significantly, suggesting that the TRIP was not a definitive measure of prosodic differences in English. Second, a group of listeners was asked to identify native versus non-native English speakers based only on selected stimuli from the TRIP and a short sentence of comparable length. The listeners were significantly better able to identify native and non-native speakers when listening to the sentence than when listening to the TRIP items. Clinical application of this information in working with LEP clients is discussed.

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