Effects of Teaching Preschool Peers to Use the Mand-Model Procedure During Snack Activities This investigation was designed to evaluate the effects of scripted direct instruction sessions, role playing with an adult and another child, feedback, in vivo teacher prompting, and praise on typically developing preschoolers’ use of the mand-model procedure; and to evaluate the effects of that use on the communication behavior of ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   January 01, 1993
Effects of Teaching Preschool Peers to Use the Mand-Model Procedure During Snack Activities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Martha L. Venn, MS
    Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
    Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny-Singer Research Institute, 320 E. North Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15212
  • Mark Wolery
    Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Lucy A. Fleming
    Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Lisa D. DeCesare
    Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Andrea Morris
    Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
  • Melanie Sigesmund Cuffs
    Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA
Article Information
Special Populations / School-Based Settings / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   January 01, 1993
Effects of Teaching Preschool Peers to Use the Mand-Model Procedure During Snack Activities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 38-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.38
History: Received November 25, 1991 , Accepted October 5, 1992
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1993, Vol. 2, 38-46. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0201.38
History: Received November 25, 1991; Accepted October 5, 1992

This investigation was designed to evaluate the effects of scripted direct instruction sessions, role playing with an adult and another child, feedback, in vivo teacher prompting, and praise on typically developing preschoolers’ use of the mand-model procedure; and to evaluate the effects of that use on the communication behavior of their peers with disabilities during snack activities. Six children, three with typical development and three with disabilities, participated in the study. They were grouped in three dyads during snack time, and the use of the mand-model procedure by the typical children and the responses of the children with disabilities were measured. A multiple probe design across subjects was used. The results indicated that (a) the typically developing preschoolers learned to use the mand-model procedure, (b) the preschoolers with disabilities responded to the mands and models after their peers began to use the procedure, (c) inappropriate behavior by the children with disabilities increased with the introduction of the mand-model procedure and then subsided, and d) unprompted requests increased for two of the three children with disabilities.

Acknowledgments
This study was supported by the U.S. Department of Education, Office of Special Education and Rehabilitative Services, Early Education Program for Children with Disabilities (Research Institute on Preschool Mainstreaming, Grant Number H024K90005). However, the opinions expressed do not necessarily reflect the policy of the U.S. Department of Education, and no official endorsement of the U.S. Department of Education should be inferred. The authors are grateful for the assistance provided by Marilyn Hoyson of Project LEAP, and by Phillip S. Strain, Director, and M. Ariane Holcombe, Margaret G. Werts, Elaine Singer-Jeffries, and Donna Guillen, of the Early Childhood Intervention Program, Allegheny Singer Research Institute, Pittsburgh, PA.
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