Remediating Unintelligible Utterances of a Child With a Mild Hearing Loss An individualized phonological cycles remediation plan was designed and implemented for a highly unintelligible 4-year-old child with an unusual hearing loss. At the age of 6:3 (yrs:mos), the client was fit with hearing aids that were worn during remediation sessions and also during speech-practice periods at home. Phonological deviation percentage-of-occurrence ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   September 01, 1992
Remediating Unintelligible Utterances of a Child With a Mild Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mary Gordon-Brannan
    Portland State University, Oregon
  • Barbara W. Hodson, PhD
    The Wichita State University, Kansas
    Communicative Disorders & Sciences, The Wichita State University, Box 75, Wichita, KS 67208-1595
  • Michael K. Wynne
    The Wichita State University, Kansas
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   September 01, 1992
Remediating Unintelligible Utterances of a Child With a Mild Hearing Loss
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 28-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.28
History: Received April 3, 1991 , Accepted May 15, 1992
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 28-38. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.28
History: Received April 3, 1991; Accepted May 15, 1992

An individualized phonological cycles remediation plan was designed and implemented for a highly unintelligible 4-year-old child with an unusual hearing loss. At the age of 6:3 (yrs:mos), the client was fit with hearing aids that were worn during remediation sessions and also during speech-practice periods at home. Phonological deviation percentage-of-occurrence scores decreased markedly during the 2-year period of phonological remediation, and the associated severity level changed from severe to mild. Phonological assessment percentage-of-occurrence scores and specific remediation target patterns and phonemes for each cycle are presented and discussed. Intelligibility measures are also provided for spontaneous connected speech samples recorded at the onset and at the time of dismissal from the phonology clinic.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank Eileen Koehn and Beth Rogers for their assistance in listening to the client’s audiotape and identifying recognizable words for the intelligibility-measure-by-unfamiliar-listeners component of this study. Appreciation is also expressed to Sandy Friel-Patti, Nickola Nelson, and an anonymous reviewer for excellent comments and suggestions during the review process. Portions of the results of this case study were presented at the 1991 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association annual convention in Atlanta, Georgia.
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