Identification of Early Stuttering Issues and Suggested Strategies Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   September 01, 1992
Identification of Early Stuttering
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Onslow
    School of Communication Disorders, The University of Sydney, PO Box 170, Lidcombe, New South Wales, 2141, Australia
  • The author’s colleagues at the Stuttering Unit at Lidcombe Hospital, Sydney, Australia, assisted with the formulation of many of the ideas presented in this paper. In particular, collaboration in clinical practice with Cheryl Andrews and Leanne Costa over many years provided the motivation for writing the manuscript. The author is grateful also for the input of Elisabeth Harrison and Michelle Lincoln. The ideas and editorial skills of the associate editor, Martin Adams, and the critiques of his consulting reviewers, Hugo Gregory and Glyndon Riley, are acknowledged as important contributions to this paper.
    The author’s colleagues at the Stuttering Unit at Lidcombe Hospital, Sydney, Australia, assisted with the formulation of many of the ideas presented in this paper. In particular, collaboration in clinical practice with Cheryl Andrews and Leanne Costa over many years provided the motivation for writing the manuscript. The author is grateful also for the input of Elisabeth Harrison and Michelle Lincoln. The ideas and editorial skills of the associate editor, Martin Adams, and the critiques of his consulting reviewers, Hugo Gregory and Glyndon Riley, are acknowledged as important contributions to this paper.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Fluency Disorders / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   September 01, 1992
Identification of Early Stuttering
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 21-27. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.21
History: Received July 17, 1991 , Accepted May 15, 1992
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 21-27. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.21
History: Received July 17, 1991; Accepted May 15, 1992

Strategies to identify early stuttering are discussed. These strategies involve two components, one for positive identification and one for negative identification. It is argued that false negative identification of early stuttering warrants more concern than false positive identification. Accordingly, identification strategies are suggested that are intended to eliminate false negative identification. The positive identification of early stuttering is based on Bloodstein’s (1987) consensus definition of the disorder, and on a single observation at one point in time. Negative identification is based on all available definitions and is not a consequence of a failure to make a positive identification. Provision is made for an "at-risk" register, as suggested by Adams (1977), where a child is observed regularly for a period of time before final identification, positive or negative, is made. The strategies are described in detail and some issues associated with them are discussed.

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