Inside It’s been just under a year now since we first received a submission from two of our colleagues in Beijing. Since that time, two editorial consultants, proficient in Mandarin Chinese, have assisted me with the World View column. This long-distance interchange with the authors, Xu Fang and Ha Ping-an, has ... Editorial
Editorial  |   September 01, 1992
Inside
 
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Editorial
Editorial   |   September 01, 1992
Inside
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.02
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 2. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.02
It’s been just under a year now since we first received a submission from two of our colleagues in Beijing. Since that time, two editorial consultants, proficient in Mandarin Chinese, have assisted me with the World View column. This long-distance interchange with the authors, Xu Fang and Ha Ping-an, has resulted an interesting perspective on articulation disorders among Mandarin Chinese speakers. Among other things, the similarities of the errors found (to those who use the English phonological system) are striking. As the authors note, special education has only recently received emphasis in China; the emphasis, as with our own developmental history, has been on an etiological orientation. Thus, concern has centered on the sensory, physical, and/or cognitive deficits rather than on characterizations of the concomitant communication deficits per se. This work represents the first known attempt to study patterns of articulation disorders in speakers of Mandarin Chinese. Xu Fang and Ha Ping-an hope that their beginnings may result in continued clinical research by Americans who provide services to ESL students from Mandarin-speaking homes.
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