Adductor and Abductor Spasmodic Dysphonia Different Disorders Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   September 01, 1992
Adductor and Abductor Spasmodic Dysphonia
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Watterson, PhD
    University of Nevada, Reno
    Redfield Building, Department of Speech Pathology & Audiology, University of Nevada, Reno, NV 89557
  • Stephen C. McFarlane
    University of Nevada, Reno
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   September 01, 1992
Adductor and Abductor Spasmodic Dysphonia
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 19-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.19
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 19-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.19
Watterson
McFarlane
Question: Is abductor spasmodic (spastic) dysphonia a form of adductor spasmodic dysphonia or is it a different voice disorder?
Response: They are different disorders.
Spasmodic dysphonia (SD) has long evoked controversy in the professions of speech-language pathology and otolaryngology. In fact, we even have difficulty deciding by what name to call it. Is it spastic dysphonia, spasmodic dysphonia, or something else? The question, however, that we have been asked to address involves more than just the name of a disorder; it is also concerned with the etiological relationship between two distinctly different dysphonias. We will argue that the vocal characteristics sometimes referred to as “abductor” SD are not a form of SD but rather a distinctly different voice disorder that has been mistakenly confused with SD.
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