Articulation Disorders Among Speakers of Mandarin Chinese The data reported show similarities to the English phonological system, especially with respect to (a) fronting of consonants, (b) phonologic context dependence, (c) non-native language phoneme substitution (e.g., glottal replacement), and (d) omission and addition of phonemes. It appears that a major phonological simplification process common to English speakers, final ... World View
World View  |   September 01, 1992
Articulation Disorders Among Speakers of Mandarin Chinese
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Xu Fang
    Division of Special Education, China Central Institute of Educational Research, 46# Beisanhuanzhonglu, Beijing, China 100088
  • Ha Ping-an
    Beijing Language Institute, China
  • A very special thanks is extended to two consulting editors, fluent in Mandarin Chinese, without whose editorial assistance and guidance this manuscript may have been published with numerous errors of translation. For their efforts, I am indebted to Li Rong Lilly Cheng of San Diego State University and Joan Laughton of The University of Georgia.
    A very special thanks is extended to two consulting editors, fluent in Mandarin Chinese, without whose editorial assistance and guidance this manuscript may have been published with numerous errors of translation. For their efforts, I am indebted to Li Rong Lilly Cheng of San Diego State University and Joan Laughton of The University of Georgia.×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / World View
World View   |   September 01, 1992
Articulation Disorders Among Speakers of Mandarin Chinese
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 15-16. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.15
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1992, Vol. 1, 15-16. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0104.15

The data reported show similarities to the English phonological system, especially with respect to (a) fronting of consonants, (b) phonologic context dependence, (c) non-native language phoneme substitution (e.g., glottal replacement), and (d) omission and addition of phonemes. It appears that a major phonological simplification process common to English speakers, final consonant deletion, or replacement, can only occur in the /n/ or /η/ final consonants of Mandarin, but that initial consonant deletion or replacement may be a more frequent pattern.

We hope that Americans working with English as a Second Language students from Mandarin-speaking homes might join colleagues in China in studying articulatory error patterns in Mandarin.

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