Some Questions and Answers About Velopharyngeal Dysfunction During Speech What is the primary symptom of velopharyngeal dysfunction? Uncontrollable nasalization of speech in both hypernasal voice quality and nasal distortion of plosives and fricatives. Inability to close the velopharyngeal opening properly and, hence, prevent hypernasalized speech, is characteristic of patients with an open, unrepaired cleft palate and patients ... Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult  |   May 01, 1992
Some Questions and Answers About Velopharyngeal Dysfunction During Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hughlett L. Morris, PhD
    C-21-3GH, Department of Otolarnygology, The University of Iowa Hospitals, 200 Hawkins Drive, Iowa City, IA 52242
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult   |   May 01, 1992
Some Questions and Answers About Velopharyngeal Dysfunction During Speech
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1992, Vol. 1, 26-28. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0103.26
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, May 1992, Vol. 1, 26-28. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0103.26
What is the primary symptom of velopharyngeal dysfunction?
Uncontrollable nasalization of speech in both hypernasal voice quality and nasal distortion of plosives and fricatives.
Inability to close the velopharyngeal opening properly and, hence, prevent hypernasalized speech, is characteristic of patients with an open, unrepaired cleft palate and patients with submucous cleft palate; it is sometimes (25% probability) found in patients with surgically repaired cleft palate; and it is occasionally found in patients with no history of cleft palate (congenital palatopharyngeal incompetence or CPI). Also, patients with some neurologic disorders or diseases show an inability to close the velopharyngeal opening normally as part of neuromotor incoordination.
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