Fluency Controls and Automatic Fluency Do fluency controls ever promote automatic fluency? My thinking on this matter has been shaped by a series of events that began in 1964. That was the year I gave up psychotherapy as the preferred method of treatment for stuttering. It helped how people felt about themselves, but their fluency ... Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult  |   January 01, 1992
Fluency Controls and Automatic Fluency
 
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Clinical Consults
Clinical Consult   |   January 01, 1992
Fluency Controls and Automatic Fluency
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 9-10. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.09
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 9-10. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.09
Do fluency controls ever promote automatic fluency?
My thinking on this matter has been shaped by a series of events that began in 1964. That was the year I gave up psychotherapy as the preferred method of treatment for stuttering. It helped how people felt about themselves, but their fluency did not improve much. This change in clinical approach was made possible by a copy of Israel Goldiamond’s grant report to the Office of Naval Research (ONR) which I inadvertently obtained. It was the basis for his subsequent publication (cf. Goldiamond, 1965) in which he described a technique for establishing fluency with delayed auditory feedback. I experimented with this method and discovered the first predictable effect on stuttering I had ever seen. Because I could now achieve fluency within minutes, and because freedom from stuttering was the objective I could not achieve with psychotherapy, switching horses in mid-therapy stream was easy.
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