The Quality of Life of Young Adults With Histories of Specific Language Impairment When a child is diagnosed as having a language disorder, parents may ask the speech-language pathologist questions such as "How might this language disorder affect my child’s life?" Unfortunately, professionals have little empirical information upon which to base an answer to this question. The purpose of this paper is to ... Research Article
Research Article  |   January 01, 1992
The Quality of Life of Young Adults With Histories of Specific Language Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nancy L. Records
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
    Department of Speech Pathology and Audiology The University of Iowa Iowa City, IA 52242
  • J. Bruce Tomblin
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Paula R. Freese
    The University of Iowa, Iowa City
Article Information
Research Articles
Research Article   |   January 01, 1992
The Quality of Life of Young Adults With Histories of Specific Language Impairment
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 44-53. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.44
History: Received April 8, 1991 , Accepted October 8, 1991
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 44-53. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.44
History: Received April 8, 1991; Accepted October 8, 1991

When a child is diagnosed as having a language disorder, parents may ask the speech-language pathologist questions such as "How might this language disorder affect my child’s life?" Unfortunately, professionals have little empirical information upon which to base an answer to this question. The purpose of this paper is to provide information regarding reported quality of life (QOL) for a group of young adults with histories of mild to severe specific language impairment who had received language treatment. A QOL measurement tool was developed to gather information about personal happiness, life satisfaction, and status in various life domains (e.g,, education, occupation, family/social life). This QOL survey was used with 29 young adults with language impairments (M = 21:6 years) and 29 controls (M = 20:4 years). The results indicated no statistically significant differences between the two groups in the various subjective components of quality of life.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by a grant from the National Institutes of Health (NIH USPHS ROl DC00612–02) to J. Bruce Tomblin. Portions of this paper were presented at the Convention of the American Speech–Language–Hearing Association in Seattle, November 1990.
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