Analyzing the Potential Benefit of Microcomputer Use for Teaching Figurative Language Microcomputers offer the potential for increasing the effectiveness of language intervention for school-age children and adolescents who have language-learning disabilities. One promising application is in the treatment of students who experience difficulty comprehending figurative expressions, an aspect of language that occurs frequently in both spoken and written contexts. Although software ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   January 01, 1992
Analyzing the Potential Benefit of Microcomputer Use for Teaching Figurative Language
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Marilyn A. Nippold
    University of Oregon, Eugene
    Communication Disorders & Sciences University of Oregon Eugene, OR 97403
  • Ilsa E. Schwarz
    University of Oregon, Eugene
  • Molly Lewis
    Lebanon School District, Lebanon, OR
Article Information
Tutorial
Tutorial   |   January 01, 1992
Analyzing the Potential Benefit of Microcomputer Use for Teaching Figurative Language
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 36-43. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.36
History: Received January 10, 1991 , Accepted October 2, 1991
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 36-43. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.36
History: Received January 10, 1991; Accepted October 2, 1991

Microcomputers offer the potential for increasing the effectiveness of language intervention for school-age children and adolescents who have language-learning disabilities. One promising application is in the treatment of students who experience difficulty comprehending figurative expressions, an aspect of language that occurs frequently in both spoken and written contexts. Although software is available to teach figurative language to children and adolescents, it is our feeling that improvements are needed in the existing programs. Software should be reviewed carefully before it is used with students, just as standardized tests and other clinical and educational materials are routinely scrutinized before use. In this article, four microcomputer programs are described and evaluated. Suggestions are then offered for the development of new types of software to teach figurative language.

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