Typing to Talk Facilitated Communication Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   January 01, 1992
Typing to Talk
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Douglas Biklen
    Division of Special Education and Rehabilitation, Syracuse University
Article Information
Second Opinions
Second Opinion   |   January 01, 1992
Typing to Talk
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 15-17. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.15
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 15-17. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.15
Neil is 25 years old. He does not speak. Occasionally he screams for no apparent reason, makes moaning sounds, rocks back and forth, hits objects such as a desk, and bites the fat of his hand above the thumb. He spent the majority of his public school years in a special school for students with severe retardation. He is labeled autistic.
With an adult supporting his hand at the wrist, he types with his index finger, revealing unexpected literacy. The method is called facilitated communication. One of Neil’s facilitators recently asked him to complete the sentence, “When people see me they think I probably ______ .” Neil typed “AM MEAN.” When asked why people might think he is mean, Neil typed, “HOW I LOOK.” Then Neil was asked to complete the sentence, “The thing I’d like others to know about my handicap is _____ .” Neil typed, “I CANNOT HIDE IT.”
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