Understanding Cultural Diversity Must a speech-language pathologist be bilingual to work effectively with a family that speaks a different language? What are the key considerations for selecting, training, and communicating through an interpreter? No, a speech-language pathologist need not be bilingual to work effectively with a family that speaks a different language. When ... Clinical Consult
Clinical Consult  |   January 01, 1992
Understanding Cultural Diversity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Noma B. Anderson
    Howard University
Article Information
Clinical Consults
Clinical Consult   |   January 01, 1992
Understanding Cultural Diversity
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 11-12. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.11
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, January 1992, Vol. 1, 11-12. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0102.11
Must a speech-language pathologist be bilingual to work effectively with a family that speaks a different language? What are the key considerations for selecting, training, and communicating through an interpreter?
No, a speech-language pathologist need not be bilingual to work effectively with a family that speaks a different language. When an interpreter is available, communication between the speech-language pathologist and the family is, of course, improved, but it is still complex. When a speech-language facility is located in a multilingual community, it is important to have interpreters on staff. When families of children who are disabled or at risk know that an individual at the facility speaks their language, their apprehension about seeking services may be reduced (Roberts, 1990). When families begin working with an interpreter, it is important that the same interpreter be consistently present to work with the family.
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