Moving From "Parent Involvement" to Family-Centered Services Although speech-language pathologists and audiologists have focused for years on involving parents and family members in intervention (Luterman, 1979; Van Riper, 1954; Webster, 1966,1977), recent shifts in legislation, theoretical perspectives, and consumer advocacy are leading many professionals to reexamine their beliefs and practices related to working with families of ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   September 01, 1991
Moving From "Parent Involvement" to Family-Centered Services
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Elizabeth R. Crais
    Division of Speech and Hearing Services University of North Carolina
Article Information
Viewpoint
Viewpoint   |   September 01, 1991
Moving From "Parent Involvement" to Family-Centered Services
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1991, Vol. 1, 5-8. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0101.05
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1991, Vol. 1, 5-8. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0101.05
Although speech-language pathologists and audiologists have focused for years on involving parents and family members in intervention (Luterman, 1979; Van Riper, 1954; Webster, 1966,1977), recent shifts in legislation, theoretical perspectives, and consumer advocacy are leading many professionals to reexamine their beliefs and practices related to working with families of clients with special needs. In spite of our intent to involve families, traditional service delivery models have often dictated a limited and passive role for family members throughout the assessment and intervention process (Brinckerhoff & Vincent, 1987; Turnbull & Hughes, 1987; Vaughn, Bos, Harrell, & Lasky, 1988). In attempting to involve families in our plans or activities, we have often failed to recognize that we are the ones who should be asking how we might involve ourselves in their lives. In an effort to challenge professionals to rethink their own beliefs and practices and to examine the programmatic policies and practices that surround them, this article highlights a few critical issues related to interacting with families and presents concrete ideas for stimulating thinking and identifying areas in need of change.
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