The Implications of Emergent Literacy Research for Children With Developmental Disabilities Recent research in emergent literacy has led to a conceptualization of literacy learning as a continuous process that begins at birth. Such a view has critical implications for children with developmental disabilities because it implies that the potential for written language learning is present in everyone. In this article, emergent ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   September 01, 1991
The Implications of Emergent Literacy Research for Children With Developmental Disabilities
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. Koppenhaver
    The Carolina Literacy Center Department of Medical Allied Professions University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CB#8135 Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8135
  • Patsy P. Coleman
    The Carolina Literacy Center Department of Medical Allied Professions University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CB#8135 Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8135
  • Sophia L. Kalman
    The Carolina Literacy Center Department of Medical Allied Professions University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CB#8135 Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8135
  • David E. Yoder
    The Carolina Literacy Center Department of Medical Allied Professions University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill CB#8135 Chapel Hill, NC 27599-8135
Article Information
Tutorial
Tutorial   |   September 01, 1991
The Implications of Emergent Literacy Research for Children With Developmental Disabilities
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1991, Vol. 1, 38-44. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0101.38
History: Received March 8, 1991 , Accepted June 10, 1991
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1991, Vol. 1, 38-44. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0101.38
History: Received March 8, 1991; Accepted June 10, 1991

Recent research in emergent literacy has led to a conceptualization of literacy learning as a continuous process that begins at birth. Such a view has critical implications for children with developmental disabilities because it implies that the potential for written language learning is present in everyone. In this article, emergent literacy research in both nondisabled children and children with developmental disabilities is synthesized. Implications of the research for parents, practitioners, and researchers are drawn.

Acknowledgments
Preparation of this manuscript and development of the ideas herein is made possible in part by a grant from the Kate B. Reynolds Health Care Trust. The authors wish to thank Marilyn Newhoff and anonymous reviewers for their helpful comments on an earlier draft of this manuscript. This paper was presented in part at the 1990 meeting of the American Association on Mental Retardation in Atlanta.
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