After the Clinical Bedside Swallowing Examination What Next? Second Opinion
Second Opinion  |   September 01, 1991
After the Clinical Bedside Swallowing Examination
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan E. Langmore
    Department of Veterans Affairs Medical Center Ann Arbor, Michigan
  • Jeri A. Logemann
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
Article Information
Second Opinion
Second Opinion   |   September 01, 1991
After the Clinical Bedside Swallowing Examination
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1991, Vol. 1, 13-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0101.13
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, September 1991, Vol. 1, 13-20. doi:10.1044/1058-0360.0101.13
Langmore
Logemann
When evaluating dysphagic patients, most speech-language pathologists begin with a bedside or clinical assessment of the patient’s behavior, language, and cognitive skills, a review of the patient’s history and medical status and oromotor function, and an examination of selected types of swallows. Whether or not actual swallows of foods or liquids are completed in this initial assessment usually depends upon the patient’s medical status. Patients who are more seriously ill or who have significant respiratory difficulties, including patients on ventilators, often do not receive any actual swallows of food or liquid at the bedside. The decision as to which patients receive routine introduction of food or liquid at the bedside with external evaluation of apparent swallow physiology will depend upon the clinician’s judgment of the patient’s ability to tolerate any aspiration that may occur and that may be undetected at the bedside (Logemann, 1983). Studies show that approximately 38-40% percent of aspiration is undetected at the bedside. More important, the physiology of the pharyngeal swallow is not observable at the bedside, and the reason for any aspiration cannot be defined. Swallow treatment is dependent on the etiology for the aspiration.
First Page Preview
First page PDF preview
First page PDF preview ×
View Large
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access