Historical and Cultural Influences on Establishing Professional Legitimacy: A Case Example From Lionel Logue PurposeIn the film The King’s Speech, the credibility of the king’s speech clinician, Lionel Logue, is challenged. This article examines Logue’s credentials in light of the credentialing standards and attitudes of Logue’s time as well as those affecting today’s practices. The aim is to show how standards of legitimacy change ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   November 2012
Historical and Cultural Influences on Establishing Professional Legitimacy: A Case Example From Lionel Logue
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Judith Felson Duchan
    The State University of New York at Buffalo
  • Correspondence to Judith Felson Duchan: duchan@buffalo.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Patrick Finn
    Associate Editor: Patrick Finn×
  • © 2012 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Special Populations / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Professional Issues & Training / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   November 2012
Historical and Cultural Influences on Establishing Professional Legitimacy: A Case Example From Lionel Logue
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 387-396. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0122)
History: Received September 9, 2011 , Revised February 10, 2012 , Accepted April 2, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 387-396. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0122)
History: Received September 9, 2011; Revised February 10, 2012; Accepted April 2, 2012

PurposeIn the film The King’s Speech, the credibility of the king’s speech clinician, Lionel Logue, is challenged. This article examines Logue’s credentials in light of the credentialing standards and attitudes of Logue’s time as well as those affecting today’s practices. The aim is to show how standards of legitimacy change with the times.

MethodDocuments related to clinical qualifications and clinical practices are analyzed for the period in the early 20th century, when Logue practiced. They are then compared with how clinicians of today attain professional legitimacy.

ConclusionEarly 20th century clinicians drew their credibility from their home disciplines such as medicine, phonetics, elocution, and education. Some of their therapies originated in the home discipline. Other therapies were commonly used, regardless of one’s disciplinary background. Lionel Logue’s background and methods would not have been suspect in his time. He may have been faulted by some for his lack of scientific perspective, but another likely source for the challenges to his credibility were early 20th century British social biases against Australians and against those using Australian dialects. The comparative analysis revealed that early 20th century clinicians and clinicians of today have certain clinical practices in common, but they differ considerably in how they establish their legitimacy. This indicates that judgments about a clinician’s legitimacy are both historically and culturally determined.

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