Effect of Training Frequency on Maximum Expiratory Pressure Purpose To determine the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) frequency on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP). Method We assigned 12 healthy participants to 2 groups of training frequency (3 days per week and 5 days per week). They completed a 4-week training program on an EMST trainer ... Research Note
Research Note  |   November 01, 2012
Effect of Training Frequency on Maximum Expiratory Pressure
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Supraja Anand
    University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Nour El-Bashiti
    University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
  • Christine Sapienza
    University of Florida, Gainesville, FL
    Brain Rehabilitation Research Center, Malcom Randall VA Medical Center, Gainesville, FL
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    Dr. Christine Sapienza has a financial interest as a scientific advisory board member of Aspire Products, LLC.
    Dr. Christine Sapienza has a financial interest as a scientific advisory board member of Aspire Products, LLC.×
  • Correspondence to Supraja Anand: supraja.anand@ufl.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Kate Bunton
    Associate Editor: Kate Bunton×
Article Information
Swallowing, Dysphagia & Feeding Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Note
Research Note   |   November 01, 2012
Effect of Training Frequency on Maximum Expiratory Pressure
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 380-386. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0048)
History: Received May 6, 2011 , Revised October 26, 2011 , Accepted April 25, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 380-386. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0048)
History: Received May 6, 2011; Revised October 26, 2011; Accepted April 25, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose To determine the effects of expiratory muscle strength training (EMST) frequency on maximum expiratory pressure (MEP).

Method We assigned 12 healthy participants to 2 groups of training frequency (3 days per week and 5 days per week). They completed a 4-week training program on an EMST trainer (Aspire Products, LLC). MEP was the primary outcome measure used to determine the effect of training frequency.

Results Participants who trained 3 days per week produced equivalent amounts of improvement in MEP compared with participants who trained 5 days per week. An overall improvement in MEP over the 4-week training period indicated a 33% increase when the data was collapsed across the 2 training groups.

Conclusion The effects occurring with respiratory muscle strength training in healthy young adults are likely to be different from those occurring in patient populations. Therefore, the results of the present study suggest exploring the variable of training frequency in patient populations. Such knowledge will be informative for designing clinical protocols that are effective and may result in improved treatment compliance for those suffering from expiratory muscle weakness.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by the Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, University of Florida, Gainesville. Additional appreciation is given to Dan Neal, Department of Biostatistics, University of Florida, for his assistance with statistical analysis and interpretation. This study was approved by the institutional review board at the University of Florida (IRB No. 2009-U-1249).
Author Contributions: All authors have contributed to the paper’s concept, methods, analysis and discussion. The first and second authors developed the protocol, collected and analyzed data (including statistical analysis), and wrote significant portions of the manuscript as a part of their doctoral requirements. The third author provided mentorship and technical assistance through every phase of the project, and edited significant portions of the manuscript.
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