Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson Disease Purpose To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a newly developed assistive technology system, Lee Silverman Voice Treatment Companion (LSVT® Companion™, hereafter referred to as “Companion”), to support the delivery of LSVT®LOUD, an efficacious speech intervention for individuals with Parkinson disease (PD). Method Sixteen individuals with PD were ... Research Article
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Research Article  |   November 01, 2012
Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson Disease
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Angela E. Halpern
    University of Colorado at Boulder
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver, CO
  • Lorraine O. Ramig
    University of Colorado at Boulder
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver, CO
  • Carlos E. C. Matos
    Faculdade Ruy Barbosa, Salvador, Brazil
  • Jill A. Petska-Cable
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver, CO
  • Jennifer L. Spielman
    University of Colorado at Boulder
    National Center for Voice and Speech, Denver, CO
  • Janice M. Pogoda
    University of Southern California, Los Angeles
  • Phillip M. Gilley
    University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Shimon Sapir
    University of Haifa, Israel
  • John K. Bennett
    University of Colorado at Boulder
  • David H. McFarland
    Université de Montréal, Quebec, Canada
    McGill University, Montreal, Quebec, Canada
  • Disclosure Statement
    Disclosure Statement×
    Angela E. Halpern, Lorraine O. Ramig, Carlos E. C. Matos, Jill A. Petska-Cable, and David H. McFarland are affiliated with, and receive financial compensation from, LSVT Global, Inc. LSVT Global owns and holds the patent for the LSVT® Companion system.
    Angela E. Halpern, Lorraine O. Ramig, Carlos E. C. Matos, Jill A. Petska-Cable, and David H. McFarland are affiliated with, and receive financial compensation from, LSVT Global, Inc. LSVT Global owns and holds the patent for the LSVT® Companion system.×
  • Correspondence to Angela E. Halpern: angela.halpern@lsvtglobal.com
  • Jill A. Petska-Cable is now also affiliated with Banner Health.
    Jill A. Petska-Cable is now also affiliated with Banner Health.×
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Rebecca Leonard
    Associate Editor: Rebecca Leonard×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Voice Disorders / Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2012
Innovative Technology for the Assisted Delivery of Intensive Voice Treatment (LSVT®LOUD) for Parkinson Disease
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 354-367. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0125)
History: Received September 28, 2011 , Accepted May 27, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 354-367. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0125)
History: Received September 28, 2011; Accepted May 27, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 14

Purpose To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of a newly developed assistive technology system, Lee Silverman Voice Treatment Companion (LSVT® Companion™, hereafter referred to as “Companion”), to support the delivery of LSVT®LOUD, an efficacious speech intervention for individuals with Parkinson disease (PD).

Method Sixteen individuals with PD were randomized to an immediate (n = 8) or a delayed (n = 8) treatment group. They participated in 9 LSVT LOUD sessions and 7 Companion sessions, independently administered at home. Acoustic, listener perception, and voice and speech rating data were obtained immediately before (pre), immediately after (post), and at 6 months post treatment (follow-up). System usability ratings were collected immediately post treatment. Changes in vocal sound pressure level were compared to data from a historical treatment group of individuals with PD treated with standard, in-person LSVT LOUD.

Results All 16 participants were able to independently use the Companion. These individuals had therapeutic gains in sound pressure level, pre to post and pre to follow-up, similar to those of the historical treatment group.

Conclusions This study supports the use of the Companion as an aid in treatment of hypokinetic dysarthria in individuals with PD. Advantages and disadvantages of the Companion, as well as limitations of the present study and directions for future studies, are discussed.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Grant R21-DC05583, The Michael J. Fox Foundation, and The Coleman Institute for Cognitive Disabilities. We thank our research assistants Heather Gustafson and Leslie Mahler. We also express our gratitude to the individuals who volunteered their time to participate in this study.
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