Monitoring Progress in Vocal Development in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients: Relationships Between Speech Samples and Scores From the Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP) Purpose To determine the concurrent validity of the Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP; Ertmer & Stoel-Gammon, 2008) and data obtained from speech samples recorded at the same intervals. Method Nineteen children who are deaf who received cochlear implants before their 3rd birthdays participated in the study. Speech ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2012
Monitoring Progress in Vocal Development in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients: Relationships Between Speech Samples and Scores From the Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP)
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David J. Ertmer
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Jongmin Jung
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Correspondence to David J. Ertmer: dertmer@purdue.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Ken Bleile
    Associate Editor: Ken Bleile×
Article Information
Development / Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2012
Monitoring Progress in Vocal Development in Young Cochlear Implant Recipients: Relationships Between Speech Samples and Scores From the Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP)
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 313-328. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0110)
History: Received August 16, 2011 , Revised November 14, 2011 , Accepted April 20, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 313-328. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0110)
History: Received August 16, 2011; Revised November 14, 2011; Accepted April 20, 2012

Purpose To determine the concurrent validity of the Conditioned Assessment of Speech Production (CASP; Ertmer & Stoel-Gammon, 2008) and data obtained from speech samples recorded at the same intervals.

Method Nineteen children who are deaf who received cochlear implants before their 3rd birthdays participated in the study. Speech samples and CASP scores were gathered at 6, 12, 18, and 24 months postactivation. Correlation analyses were conducted to assess the concurrent validity of CASP scores and data from samples.

Results CASP scores showed strong concurrent validity with scores from speech samples gathered across all recording sessions (6–24 months).

Conclusions The CASP was found to be a valid, reliable, and time-efficient tool for assessing progress in vocal development during young cochlear implant recipients' first 2 years of device experience.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported by a grant to the first author from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (NIDCD; Grant R01DC007863). We are especially grateful to the parents and children who made this study possible. Sincere appreciation is also offered to the following individuals for their indispensible assistance in recruiting participants and collecting speech samples and CASP scores: Michele Wilkins, Wendy Ban Deters, Monica Brumbaugh, Jennifer Haney, Monica Lynch, and Lyra Repplinger, at Childs Voice school (Wood Dale, IL); Maria Sentelik, Margo Appenzeller, Megan Mercurio, Carey Evans Ratliff, and Meredith Wessels of Ohio Valley Voices (Loveland, OH); Mary Daniels, Cheryl Broekelmann, Kathy Gallagher, Barb Meyers, Judy Odendahl, and Audrea Strelo at the St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (Chesterfield, MO). Teri Ouellette and Carrie Tamminga at the St. Joseph Institute for the Deaf (Indianapolis, IN); and Jean Moog, Betsy Moog, Rhonda Bennight, Mariana Helbig, and Laurie Preusser at the Moog Center (Chesterfield, MO). Katie Connell Kirleis, Christy Macak, Elesha Sharp, Jennifer Slanker, Diana True Kloiber, A. J. Olszewski, and Stephanie Wieczorek helped with data management and analysis.
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