Can Semantic Enrichment Lead to Naming in a Word Extension Task? Purpose This study examined the relationship between semantic enrichment and naming in children asked to extend taught words to untrained exemplars. Method Sixteen typically developing children (M = 32.63 months, SD = 4.02) participated in 3 word learning conditions that varied semantic enrichment via iconic (shape, function) or ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2012
Can Semantic Enrichment Lead to Naming in a Word Extension Task?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Nina Capone Singleton
    Seton Hall University, South Orange, NJ
  • Correspondence to Nina Capone Singleton: nina.capone@shu.edu
  • Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer
    Editor: Carol Scheffner Hammer×
  • Associate Editor: Holly Storkel
    Associate Editor: Holly Storkel×
Article Information
Development / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2012
Can Semantic Enrichment Lead to Naming in a Word Extension Task?
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 279-292. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0019)
History: Received February 17, 2011 , Revised October 21, 2011 , Accepted April 2, 2012
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2012, Vol. 21, 279-292. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2012/11-0019)
History: Received February 17, 2011; Revised October 21, 2011; Accepted April 2, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 6

Purpose This study examined the relationship between semantic enrichment and naming in children asked to extend taught words to untrained exemplars.

Method Sixteen typically developing children (M = 32.63 months, SD = 4.02) participated in 3 word learning conditions that varied semantic enrichment via iconic (shape, function) or point gesture. At test, children named taught referents and 2 exemplars of each taught object: shape similar and shape dissimilar. Naming accuracy and errors were analyzed between conditions.

Results The point condition never outperformed the shape or function conditions. In naming taught words, the shape condition was superior to the point condition, whereas the function condition was only marginally superior to the point condition. However, in naming untrained exemplars, only the shape condition was superior to the point condition, and there were fewer indeterminate errors in the shape condition.

Conclusion Semantic enrichment supports naming, but shape cues appear to be particularly effective in using words beyond just-taught referents.

Acknowledgments
I acknowledge the School of Health and Medical Sciences at Seton Hall University for financial support during data collection.I thank Monique Kaye and Suzanne MacMaster for careful reliability coding and the families who participated in the study for welcoming me into their homes. Gratitude is extended to Karla McGregor and Anthony Koutsoftas for comments on an early draft of the article.
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