A Review of Standardized Tests of Nonverbal Oral and Speech Motor Performance in Children Purpose: To review the content and psychometric characteristics of 6 published tests currently available to aid in the study, diagnosis, and treatment of motor speech disorders in children.Method: We compared the content of the 6 tests and critically evaluated the degree to which important psychometric characteristics support the ... Research
Research  |   February 2008
A Review of Standardized Tests of Nonverbal Oral and Speech Motor Performance in Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca J. McCauley
    University of Vermont, Burlington
  • Edythe A. Strand
    The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Contact author: Rebecca McCauley, 402 Pomeroy Hall, University of Vermont, 489 Main Street, Burlington, VT 05405-0010. E-mail: rebecca.mccauley@uvm.edu.
  • © 2008 American Speech-Language-Hearing AssociationAmerican Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Speech, Voice & Prosody
Research   |   February 2008
A Review of Standardized Tests of Nonverbal Oral and Speech Motor Performance in Children
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2008, Vol. 17, 81-91. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/007)
History: Received August 19, 2005 , Revised December 22, 2006 , Accepted July 25, 2007
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2008, Vol. 17, 81-91. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/007)
History: Received August 19, 2005; Revised December 22, 2006; Accepted July 25, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 10

Purpose: To review the content and psychometric characteristics of 6 published tests currently available to aid in the study, diagnosis, and treatment of motor speech disorders in children.

Method: We compared the content of the 6 tests and critically evaluated the degree to which important psychometric characteristics support the tests' use for their defined purposes.

Results: The tests varied considerably in content and methods of test interpretation. Few of the tests documented efforts to support reliability and validity for their intended purposes, often when relevant information was probably available during the test’s development.

Conclusions: Problems with the reviewed tests appear related to overly broad plans for test development and inadequate attention to relevant psychometric principles during the development process. Recommendations are offered for future test revisions and development efforts that can benefit from recent research in test development and in pediatric motor speech disorders.

Acknowledgments
The authors wish to acknowledge David Ridge, Ruth Stoeckel, Barry Guitar, and Kimberly Bocian for their valuable contributions to this document. Dr. Strand’s participation in this project was supported by a grant from The Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN, CR-20.
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