Comparison of Accuracy and Efficiency of Directed Scanning and Group-Item Scanning for Augmentative Communication Selection Techniques With Typically Developing Preschoolers Purpose Directed scanning and group-item scanning both represent options for increased scanning efficiency. This investigation compared accuracy and speed of selection with preschoolers using each scanning method. The study’s purpose was to describe performance characteristics of typically developing children and to provide a reliable assessment protocol to evaluate scanning skills. ... Research Article
Research Article  |   February 01, 2008
Comparison of Accuracy and Efficiency of Directed Scanning and Group-Item Scanning for Augmentative Communication Selection Techniques With Typically Developing Preschoolers
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Patricia L. Dropik
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Joe Reichle
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Joe Reichle, 115 Shevlin Hall, University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN, 55455. E-mail: reich001@umn.edu.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research Articles
Research Article   |   February 01, 2008
Comparison of Accuracy and Efficiency of Directed Scanning and Group-Item Scanning for Augmentative Communication Selection Techniques With Typically Developing Preschoolers
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2008, Vol. 17, 35-47. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/004)
History: Received October 1, 2006 , Accepted July 10, 2007
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, February 2008, Vol. 17, 35-47. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2008/004)
History: Received October 1, 2006; Accepted July 10, 2007
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose Directed scanning and group-item scanning both represent options for increased scanning efficiency. This investigation compared accuracy and speed of selection with preschoolers using each scanning method. The study’s purpose was to describe performance characteristics of typically developing children and to provide a reliable assessment protocol to evaluate scanning skills.

Method Investigators examined within-participant performance on an identity matching-to-sample task using directed and group-item scanning with 13 typically developing preschoolers. Children selected line-drawn symbols from a 36-symbol display configured for each scanning method.

Results Children were more accurate using directed than group-item scanning. They required a greater number of cursor movements to accurately select symbols with group-item than with directed scanning; however, no differences in actual selection time were apparent. Further analyses comparing performance using group-item scanning for selections requiring either a low or a high number of cursor movements revealed no differences in children’s accuracy or efficiency.

Conclusions Children were more accurate using directed scanning to select target symbols. However, directed scanning did not afford a relative advantage in children’s selection efficiency compared with group-item scanning. Performance using group-item scanning does not appear to be affected by requisite cursor movements for selection. Limitations and educational implications are discussed.

Acknowledgments
The authors would like to thank the children and staff of St. David’s Child and Family Services for their participation and support of this study. We thank Maya Alamsaputra for her assistance in data collection.
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