Group-Item and Directed Scanning: Examining Preschoolers’ Accuracy and Efficiency in Two Augmentative Communication Symbol Selection Methods Purpose The current investigation compared directed scanning and group-item scanning among typically developing 4-year-old children. Of specific interest were their accuracy, selection speed, and efficiency of cursor movement in selecting colored line drawn symbols representing object vocabulary. Method Twelve 4-year-olds made selections in both directed and group-item scanning ... Research Article
Research Article  |   November 01, 2010
Group-Item and Directed Scanning: Examining Preschoolers’ Accuracy and Efficiency in Two Augmentative Communication Symbol Selection Methods
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Aubrey Randall White
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Edward Carney
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Joe Reichle
    University of Minnesota, Minneapolis
  • Contact author: Aubrey Randall White, 5032 Oliver Avenue South, Minneapolis, MN 55419. E-mail: whit0950@umn.edu.
Article Information
Augmentative & Alternative Communication / Research Articles
Research Article   |   November 01, 2010
Group-Item and Directed Scanning: Examining Preschoolers’ Accuracy and Efficiency in Two Augmentative Communication Symbol Selection Methods
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2010, Vol. 19, 311-320. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0017)
History: Received March 5, 2009 , Revised September 2, 2009 , Accepted June 25, 2010
 
American Journal of Speech-Language Pathology, November 2010, Vol. 19, 311-320. doi:10.1044/1058-0360(2010/09-0017)
History: Received March 5, 2009; Revised September 2, 2009; Accepted June 25, 2010
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The current investigation compared directed scanning and group-item scanning among typically developing 4-year-old children. Of specific interest were their accuracy, selection speed, and efficiency of cursor movement in selecting colored line drawn symbols representing object vocabulary.

Method Twelve 4-year-olds made selections in both directed and group-item scanning conditions using a 36-symbol array that required matching line drawn symbols to pictures.

Results The majority of participants took more time in the directed scanning condition. Though not statistically significant, participants tended to be more accurate in their use of directed scanning. The cursor movements required (as a proportion of optimal cursor movements) were similar for both scanning selection techniques.

Conclusions Among typically developing 4-year-olds, there appears to be a trade-off between speed and accuracy in symbol selection when using directed or group-item scanning. Better accuracy with directed scanning appears to come at the cost of a slower response time. Whereas group-item scanning may be faster, it results in a decreased number of accurate responses. Applications for clinical practice and implications for future research are discussed.

Acknowledgments
We would like to thank the children, parents, and staff at the University of Minnesota Child Care Center, Bernie’s Montessori School, and the MinneApple International Montessori School Minneapolis and Oakdale locations. Additionally, our appreciation goes to Patti Dropik, Rick Peterson, Paige Whitney, Greta Meyer, Nicole Miller, Chris Hasenbank, and Andrea Olin for their help with this project.
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